Memphis and St. Francis area assemblages that can be created using

Memphis and St. Francis area assemblages that can be created using the IDSS algorithm, a continuity threshold of jir.2013.0113 0.30 and = 0.05 confidence Serabelisib site intervals for frequency comparisons. The confidence intervals for each assemblage are determined using 1000 bootstrap samples for each pair of assemblages. Note that many assemblages (e.g., 12-O-5) appear in multiple seriations. Also, note that many assemblages are present in more than one solution, which demonstrates the difficulty of understanding the overall pattern of change using the traditional linear representation. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942.gPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942 April 29,22 /The IDSS Frequency Seriation AlgorithmFig 12. The `minmax’ graph produced for the Memphis and St. Francis area assemblages from the 97 valid DFS solutions generated the IDSS algorithm (as shown in Fig 11) using a continuity threshold of 0.30 and = 0.05 confidence intervals for the comparison of frequencies. The “minmax” graph was generated using the procedure described in Fig 1471-2474-14-48 6. Significantly, the results show remarkable structure with a series of spatially clustered branches that are formed from overlapping but distinct sets of seriation solutions. Parkin (11-N-1) forms the center of a branch that extends in 3 different directions (to 11-N-9, 13-P-1 and 11-O-10). Assemblages AZD0865 biological activity 13-O-7 and 13-O-10 also have this same configuration. 13-O-7 has an extra branch leading to Holden Lake, a presumably earlier deposit. The branches are numbered and colored to correspond with the spatial groups in Fig 13. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942.gThis pattern is exemplified by Group 1 in Fig 13. Group 1 is composed of a single set of assemblages that fall northeast of 11-N-1 (Parkin). Parkin remains a member of more than one seriation solution with branches going to 11-N-9 and another going to a group formed by assemblages 11-O-10 and 11-N-4. Interestingly, on the basis of the IDSS results, Rose Mound (12-N-3) now appears to be more closely related to Group 2 to the south rather than being related to the group with Parkin. This configuration might explain the proximity of the two large deposits so close together. We propose that this set of archaeological deposits were created by separate lineages whose use of the landscape is focused in different directions: Parkin towards the north and Rose Mound to the south. Alternatively, the configuration of assemblagePLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942 April 29,23 /The IDSS Frequency Seriation AlgorithmFig 13. The spatial distribution of the edges of graph shown in Fig 12 and the spatial groups of assemblages. The groups outlines represent the branches of the “minmax” graph depicted in Fig 12. Note that the edges have a strong spatial pattern in that assemblages next to each other are more likely to be paired within seriation solutions than those assemblages that are farther away. A bootstrap assessment of the significance of this spatial pattern shows that p = 0.04. The color of each spatial group corresponds to the major branches in the “minmax” graph in Fig 12. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942.gPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942 April 29,24 /The IDSS Frequency Seriation Algorithmrelations may reflect use of the landscape by groups over slightly varying points in time. Further study regarding the relations between these deposits is needed. Group 2 in Fig 13 includes assemblage 13-P-1, 13-P-10 and 13-N-21 on the east side of the valley. The inclusion.Memphis and St. Francis area assemblages that can be created using the IDSS algorithm, a continuity threshold of jir.2013.0113 0.30 and = 0.05 confidence intervals for frequency comparisons. The confidence intervals for each assemblage are determined using 1000 bootstrap samples for each pair of assemblages. Note that many assemblages (e.g., 12-O-5) appear in multiple seriations. Also, note that many assemblages are present in more than one solution, which demonstrates the difficulty of understanding the overall pattern of change using the traditional linear representation. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942.gPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942 April 29,22 /The IDSS Frequency Seriation AlgorithmFig 12. The `minmax’ graph produced for the Memphis and St. Francis area assemblages from the 97 valid DFS solutions generated the IDSS algorithm (as shown in Fig 11) using a continuity threshold of 0.30 and = 0.05 confidence intervals for the comparison of frequencies. The “minmax” graph was generated using the procedure described in Fig 1471-2474-14-48 6. Significantly, the results show remarkable structure with a series of spatially clustered branches that are formed from overlapping but distinct sets of seriation solutions. Parkin (11-N-1) forms the center of a branch that extends in 3 different directions (to 11-N-9, 13-P-1 and 11-O-10). Assemblages 13-O-7 and 13-O-10 also have this same configuration. 13-O-7 has an extra branch leading to Holden Lake, a presumably earlier deposit. The branches are numbered and colored to correspond with the spatial groups in Fig 13. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942.gThis pattern is exemplified by Group 1 in Fig 13. Group 1 is composed of a single set of assemblages that fall northeast of 11-N-1 (Parkin). Parkin remains a member of more than one seriation solution with branches going to 11-N-9 and another going to a group formed by assemblages 11-O-10 and 11-N-4. Interestingly, on the basis of the IDSS results, Rose Mound (12-N-3) now appears to be more closely related to Group 2 to the south rather than being related to the group with Parkin. This configuration might explain the proximity of the two large deposits so close together. We propose that this set of archaeological deposits were created by separate lineages whose use of the landscape is focused in different directions: Parkin towards the north and Rose Mound to the south. Alternatively, the configuration of assemblagePLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942 April 29,23 /The IDSS Frequency Seriation AlgorithmFig 13. The spatial distribution of the edges of graph shown in Fig 12 and the spatial groups of assemblages. The groups outlines represent the branches of the “minmax” graph depicted in Fig 12. Note that the edges have a strong spatial pattern in that assemblages next to each other are more likely to be paired within seriation solutions than those assemblages that are farther away. A bootstrap assessment of the significance of this spatial pattern shows that p = 0.04. The color of each spatial group corresponds to the major branches in the “minmax” graph in Fig 12. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942.gPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0124942 April 29,24 /The IDSS Frequency Seriation Algorithmrelations may reflect use of the landscape by groups over slightly varying points in time. Further study regarding the relations between these deposits is needed. Group 2 in Fig 13 includes assemblage 13-P-1, 13-P-10 and 13-N-21 on the east side of the valley. The inclusion.

Leave a Reply